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Minding the sun / Robert Pack

By: Pack, Robert, 1929-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c1996Description: ix, 97 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0226644073 (cloth : alk. paper); 0226644081 (paper : alk. paper); 9780226644073 ; 9780226644080.Subject(s): American poetry -- 20th century | Nature -- Effect of human beings on -- New England -- Poetry | American poetryDDC classification: 808.81 Online resources: Publisher description | Table of contents | WorldCat details
Contents:
The Place -- Summer -- October Lingering -- The Waiting -- Eggplant -- Leaving -- The Pond -- Embellishings -- Listening -- Loon Calls -- November Dawn -- Owl Reflections -- The Watcher and the Hawk -- Snow Rise -- Storm -- Midwinter Thaw -- Betrayal -- Fox Wound -- The Wall -- Spring Returns -- Silence -- Circle -- The Merging -- Her Shoes -- Reunion -- Turtles -- Only in Zoos -- The Sea -- Laughter -- Night Swim -- Beyond Forgetting -- Homeward -- Minding the Sun -- Observer -- Hummingbird -- The Human Eye -- Rooting for Pleasure -- Panegyric for a Cockroach -- The Troll beneath the Bridge -- The Loss of Estrus -- Lament of the Male Gamete -- Falling Away -- Curing Sleep -- The Empty Throne -- Autumn Berries -- Within Measure -- The Drake Equation -- The Barber of Civility -- Witzelsucht -- Bonkers -- My Distant Friend -- Determination -- Picnic with Paradox -- Elegy to the Sun -- The Trees Will Die. Table of contents
Summary: With characteristic sensitivity and intelligence, Robert Pack reflects on man's relation to and responsibilities toward nature. Throughout, his verses are informed by an ecological vigilance born of his devotion to the New England landscape. The opening section marks a return for Pack to the musical sensuality of the lyric. These short lyrics are uniquely his: the sequence begins in Vermont and concludes in the Andromeda galaxy, providing an opportunity to hold in mind the nurturing sun of our solar system. The poems of the collection's middle section, written in the flowing narrative and meditative mode familiar to Pack's many admirers, take up the themes of human sexuality and consciousness. And the final section, replete with puns and paradoxes, shows Pack at his most playful as he muses on art, technology, romantic and marital desire, and the stubborn longing for transcendence. The poet concludes the volume with a sobering plea, "The Trees Will Die," to heed the sun's example, to cherish and protect our planet and all its living things.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Text Text EWU Library
Reserve Section
Fiction 808.81 PAM 1996 (Browse shelf) C-1 Not For Loan 10619
Total holds: 0

The Place --
Summer --
October Lingering --
The Waiting --
Eggplant --
Leaving --
The Pond --
Embellishings --
Listening --
Loon Calls --
November Dawn --
Owl Reflections --
The Watcher and the Hawk --
Snow Rise --
Storm --
Midwinter Thaw --
Betrayal --
Fox Wound --
The Wall --
Spring Returns --
Silence --
Circle --
The Merging --
Her Shoes --
Reunion --
Turtles --
Only in Zoos --
The Sea --
Laughter --
Night Swim --
Beyond Forgetting --
Homeward --
Minding the Sun --
Observer --
Hummingbird --
The Human Eye --
Rooting for Pleasure --
Panegyric for a Cockroach --
The Troll beneath the Bridge --
The Loss of Estrus --
Lament of the Male Gamete --
Falling Away --
Curing Sleep --
The Empty Throne --
Autumn Berries --
Within Measure --
The Drake Equation --
The Barber of Civility --
Witzelsucht --
Bonkers --
My Distant Friend --
Determination --
Picnic with Paradox --
Elegy to the Sun --
The Trees Will Die. Table of contents

With characteristic sensitivity and intelligence, Robert Pack reflects on man's relation to and responsibilities toward nature. Throughout, his verses are informed by an ecological vigilance born of his devotion to the New England landscape. The opening section marks a return for Pack to the musical sensuality of the lyric. These short lyrics are uniquely his: the sequence begins in Vermont and concludes in the Andromeda galaxy, providing an opportunity to hold in mind the nurturing sun of our solar system.

The poems of the collection's middle section, written in the flowing narrative and meditative mode familiar to Pack's many admirers, take up the themes of human sexuality and consciousness. And the final section, replete with puns and paradoxes, shows Pack at his most playful as he muses on art, technology, romantic and marital desire, and the stubborn longing for transcendence. The poet concludes the volume with a sobering plea, "The Trees Will Die," to heed the sun's example, to cherish and protect our planet and all its living things.

English

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