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C++ for programmers / Leen Ammeraal.

By: Ammeraal, L. (Leendert).
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Wiley, 2000Edition: 3rd ed.Description: ix, 453 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0471606979 (alk. paper); 9780471606970.Subject(s): C++ (Computer program language)DDC classification: 005.133C++ Online resources: Contributor biographical information | Publisher description | Table of Contents | WorldCat details
Contents:
Table of contents 1.1 About C++ and Other Languages 1 -- 1.2 An Unrealistic Program 3 -- 1.3 Memory Organization and Binary Numbers 7 -- 1.4 Identifiers and Keywords 9 -- 1.5 Literals 10 -- 1.6 Standard Type string 15 -- 1.7 Some Elements of STL 16 -- 2 Expressions and Statements 21 -- 2.1 Arithmetic Operations 21 -- 2.2 Types, Variables, and Assignments 25 -- 2.3 Comparison and Logical Operators 31 -- 2.4 Compound Statements and If-statements 33 -- 2.5 Iteration Statements 38 -- 2.6 Break, Continue, Goto, Switch 42 -- 2.7 Simple Declarations 46 -- 3 More Operators 49 -- 3.1 Conditional Expressions 49 -- 3.2 Comma Operator 51 -- 3.3 Bit Manipulation 55 -- 3.4 Simple Arrays 58 -- 3.5 Associativity 60 -- 3.6 Precedence of Operators and Grammar Rules 62 -- 3.7 Arithmetic Conversions and Casts 68 -- 3.8 Lvalues and Rvalues 72 -- 4 Functions and Program Structure 79 -- 4.1 Function Definitions and Declarations; Recursion 79 -- 4.2 Keyword void, Global Variables, Namespaces 84 -- 4.3 Altering Variables via Parameters 91 -- 4.4 Types of Arguments and Return Values 94 -- 4.5 More about Initialization 96 -- 4.6 Separate Compilation and Unnamed Namespaces 99 -- 4.7 Some Mathematical Standard Functions 103 -- 4.8 Function Overloading 104 -- 4.9 References as Return Values 106 -- 4.10 Reference Parameters and const 107 -- 4.11 Inline Functions 108 -- 4.12 Some Preprocessor Facilities 109 -- 5 Arrays, Pointers, and Strings 117 -- 5.1 Address Arithmetic 117 -- 5.2 Function Arguments and Arrays 119 -- 5.3 Pointers 121 -- 5.4 C-style Strings and the Standard string Type 130 -- 5.5 String Constructors and String Assignment 132 -- 5.6 C-style Strings and Conversion 134 -- 5.7 Type string: Length, Copy, and Compare 138 -- 5.8 Type string: Append, Insert, and Concatenate 141 -- 5.9 Type string: Search, Substring, and Swap 143 -- 5.10 Type string: Input and Output 144 -- 5.11 Multi-dimensional Arrays 145 -- 5.12 Arrays of Pointers and Pointers to Arrays 146 -- 5.13 Program Parameters 150 -- 5.14 In-memory Format Conversion 152 -- 5.15 Pointers to Functions 153 -- 5.16 Dynamic Memory Allocation 155 -- 6 Classes and Objects 161 -- 6.1 Word struct 161 -- 6.2 A Constructor and Other Member Functions 163 -- 6.3 Constructor Initializers 167 -- 6.4 Member Functions Defined Outside a Class 168 -- 6.5 More about Constructors 172 -- 6.6 Operator Overloading and Friend Functions 174 -- 6.7 Operators, Conversion, and the Word explicit 181 -- 6.8 Destructor and Default Constructor 187 -- 6.9 Copying a Class Object 191 -- 6.10 Inheritance 198 -- 6.11 Virtual Functions 209 -- 6.12 Run-time Type Information and dynamic_cast 217 -- 6.13 Static Class Members 219 -- 6.14 Pointers to Class Members 221 -- 6.15 Unions and Bit Fields 224 -- 6.16 Function Objects 226 -- 7 Templates 233 -- 7.2 Function Templates 233 -- 7.3 Class Templates 237 -- 7.4 Type string Revisited 242 -- 7.5 Complex Numbers 243 -- 8 Exception Handling 247 -- 8.1 Errors and Exceptions 247 -- 8.2 Using the Keywords try, catch, and throw 249 -- 8.3 Exception Classes 254 -- 8.4 Error Handling with new 256 -- 8.5 Exception Specifications 257 -- 9 Introduction to STL 259 -- 9.1 Access to Vectors via Iterators 259 -- 9.2 Vectors, Lists, Deques; Container Adaptors 262 -- 9.3 Iterator Categories 271 -- 9.4 Arrays and STL Algorithms 276 -- 9.5 Special Member Functions for Lists 279 -- 9.6 Introduction to Associative Containers 286 -- 9.7 Sets and Multisets 287 -- 9.8 Maps and Multimaps 289 -- 9.9 Pairs and Comparisons 291 -- 9.10 Function Objects and Function Adaptors 294 -- 9.11 Nonmodifying Sequence Algorithms 309 -- 9.12 Modifying Sequence Algorithms 312 -- 9.13 Sorting-related Algorithms 317 -- 9.14 Generalized Numeric Algorithms 329d -- 9.15 Bit Sequences: bitset 331 -- 10 Stream I/O 335 -- 10.1 Streams 335 -- 10.2 Output 336 -- 10.3 Input 346 -- 10.4 File I/O 353 -- 10.5 Random Access 360 -- 10.6 Error States 364 -- 10.7 In-memory Format Conversion Revisited 367 -- 11 Some Older Library Functions 373 -- 11.1 Diagnostics: <cassert> 373 -- 11.2 Character Classification: <cctype> 374 -- 11.3 Error Numbers: <cerrno> 375 -- 11.4 Floating-point Precision: <cfloat> 376 -- 11.5 Maximum Integer, etc.: <climits> 377 -- 11.6 Mathematical Functions: <cmath> 378 -- 11.7 Variable-length Argument Lists: <cstdarg> 380 -- 11.8 Input and Output: <cstdio> 381 -- 11.9 Miscellaneous: <cstdlib> 391 -- 11.10 C-style String Functions: <cstring> 393 -- 11.11 Time and Date: <ctime> 395.
Summary: Summary: "One of the attractive aspects of C++ is that it offers good facilities for object-oriented programming (OOP), but, as a hybrid language, it also supports procedural programming. The significance of this for programmers is that it offers more flexibility allowing them to shift to object-oriented programming if and when they feel the need to do so. In this regard, C++ differs from some purely object-oriented languages, such as Smalltalk, Eiffel and Java. This book offers practical guidance on how to programme in both styles."--BOOK JACKET.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 445) and index.

Table of contents 1.1 About C++ and Other Languages 1 --
1.2 An Unrealistic Program 3 --
1.3 Memory Organization and Binary Numbers 7 --
1.4 Identifiers and Keywords 9 --
1.5 Literals 10 --
1.6 Standard Type string 15 --
1.7 Some Elements of STL 16 --
2 Expressions and Statements 21 --
2.1 Arithmetic Operations 21 --
2.2 Types, Variables, and Assignments 25 --
2.3 Comparison and Logical Operators 31 --
2.4 Compound Statements and If-statements 33 --
2.5 Iteration Statements 38 --
2.6 Break, Continue, Goto, Switch 42 --
2.7 Simple Declarations 46 --
3 More Operators 49 --
3.1 Conditional Expressions 49 --
3.2 Comma Operator 51 --
3.3 Bit Manipulation 55 --
3.4 Simple Arrays 58 --
3.5 Associativity 60 --
3.6 Precedence of Operators and Grammar Rules 62 --
3.7 Arithmetic Conversions and Casts 68 --
3.8 Lvalues and Rvalues 72 --
4 Functions and Program Structure 79 --
4.1 Function Definitions and Declarations; Recursion 79 --
4.2 Keyword void, Global Variables, Namespaces 84 --
4.3 Altering Variables via Parameters 91 --
4.4 Types of Arguments and Return Values 94 --
4.5 More about Initialization 96 --
4.6 Separate Compilation and Unnamed Namespaces 99 --
4.7 Some Mathematical Standard Functions 103 --
4.8 Function Overloading 104 --
4.9 References as Return Values 106 --
4.10 Reference Parameters and const 107 --
4.11 Inline Functions 108 --
4.12 Some Preprocessor Facilities 109 --
5 Arrays, Pointers, and Strings 117 --
5.1 Address Arithmetic 117 --
5.2 Function Arguments and Arrays 119 --
5.3 Pointers 121 --
5.4 C-style Strings and the Standard string Type 130 --
5.5 String Constructors and String Assignment 132 --
5.6 C-style Strings and Conversion 134 --
5.7 Type string: Length, Copy, and Compare 138 --
5.8 Type string: Append, Insert, and Concatenate 141 --
5.9 Type string: Search, Substring, and Swap 143 --
5.10 Type string: Input and Output 144 --
5.11 Multi-dimensional Arrays 145 --
5.12 Arrays of Pointers and Pointers to Arrays 146 --
5.13 Program Parameters 150 --
5.14 In-memory Format Conversion 152 --
5.15 Pointers to Functions 153 --
5.16 Dynamic Memory Allocation 155 --
6 Classes and Objects 161 --
6.1 Word struct 161 --
6.2 A Constructor and Other Member Functions 163 --
6.3 Constructor Initializers 167 --
6.4 Member Functions Defined Outside a Class 168 --
6.5 More about Constructors 172 --
6.6 Operator Overloading and Friend Functions 174 --
6.7 Operators, Conversion, and the Word explicit 181 --
6.8 Destructor and Default Constructor 187 --
6.9 Copying a Class Object 191 --
6.10 Inheritance 198 --
6.11 Virtual Functions 209 --
6.12 Run-time Type Information and dynamic_cast 217 --
6.13 Static Class Members 219 --
6.14 Pointers to Class Members 221 --
6.15 Unions and Bit Fields 224 --
6.16 Function Objects 226 --
7 Templates 233 --
7.2 Function Templates 233 --
7.3 Class Templates 237 --
7.4 Type string Revisited 242 --
7.5 Complex Numbers 243 --
8 Exception Handling 247 --
8.1 Errors and Exceptions 247 --
8.2 Using the Keywords try, catch, and throw 249 --
8.3 Exception Classes 254 --
8.4 Error Handling with new 256 --
8.5 Exception Specifications 257 --
9 Introduction to STL 259 --
9.1 Access to Vectors via Iterators 259 --
9.2 Vectors, Lists, Deques; Container Adaptors 262 --
9.3 Iterator Categories 271 --
9.4 Arrays and STL Algorithms 276 --
9.5 Special Member Functions for Lists 279 --
9.6 Introduction to Associative Containers 286 --
9.7 Sets and Multisets 287 --
9.8 Maps and Multimaps 289 --
9.9 Pairs and Comparisons 291 --
9.10 Function Objects and Function Adaptors 294 --
9.11 Nonmodifying Sequence Algorithms 309 --
9.12 Modifying Sequence Algorithms 312 --
9.13 Sorting-related Algorithms 317 --
9.14 Generalized Numeric Algorithms 329d --
9.15 Bit Sequences: bitset 331 --
10 Stream I/O 335 --
10.1 Streams 335 --
10.2 Output 336 --
10.3 Input 346 --
10.4 File I/O 353 --
10.5 Random Access 360 --
10.6 Error States 364 --
10.7 In-memory Format Conversion Revisited 367 --
11 Some Older Library Functions 373 --
11.1 Diagnostics: <cassert> 373 --
11.2 Character Classification: <cctype> 374 --
11.3 Error Numbers: <cerrno> 375 --
11.4 Floating-point Precision: <cfloat> 376 --
11.5 Maximum Integer, etc.: <climits> 377 --
11.6 Mathematical Functions: <cmath> 378 --
11.7 Variable-length Argument Lists: <cstdarg> 380 --
11.8 Input and Output: <cstdio> 381 --
11.9 Miscellaneous: <cstdlib> 391 --
11.10 C-style String Functions: <cstring> 393 --
11.11 Time and Date: <ctime> 395.

Summary:
"One of the attractive aspects of C++ is that it offers good facilities for object-oriented programming (OOP), but, as a hybrid language, it also supports procedural programming. The significance of this for programmers is that it offers more flexibility allowing them to shift to object-oriented programming if and when they feel the need to do so. In this regard, C++ differs from some purely object-oriented languages, such as Smalltalk, Eiffel and Java. This book offers practical guidance on how to programme in both styles."--BOOK JACKET.

Computer Science & Engineering

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