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Essential quantum mechanics for electrical engineers /

by Deak, Peter.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Weinheim : John Wiley & Sons, 2017Description: xvii, 202 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9783527413553; 9783527805839.Subject(s): Quantum theoryOnline resources: WorldCat details
Contents:
Table of contents Title Page; Copyright; Dedication; Table of Contents; Preface; Chapter 1: Introduction: Classical Physics and the Physics of Information Technology; 1.1 The Perception of Matter in Classical Physics: Particles and Waves; 1.2 Axioms of Classical Physics; 1.3 Status and Effect of Classical Physics by the End of the Nineteenth Century; 1.4 Physics Background of the High-Tech Era; 1.5 Developments in Physics Reflected by the Development of Lighting Technology; 1.6 The Demand for Physics in Electrical Engineering and Informatics: Today and Tomorrow; 1.7 Questions and Exercises Chapter 2: Blackbody Radiation: The Physics of the Light Bulb and of the Pyrometer2.1 Electromagnetic Radiation of Heated Bodies; 2.2 Electromagnetic Field in Equilibrium with the Walls of a Metal Box; 2.3 Determination of the Average Energy per Degree of Freedom. Planck's Law; 2.4 Practical Applications of Planck's Law for the Blackbody Radiation; 2.5 Significance of Planck's Law for the Physics; 2.6 Questions and Exercises; Chapter 3: Photons: The Physics of Lasers; 3.1 The Photoelectric Effect 3.2 Practical Applications of the Photoelectric Effect (Photocell, Solar Cell, Chemical Analysis)3.3 The Compton Effect; 3.4 The Photon Hypothesis of Einstein; 3.5 Planck's Law and the Photons. Stimulated Emission; 3.6 The Laser; 3.7 Questions and Exercises; Chapter 4: Electrons: The Physics of the Discharge Lamps; 4.1 Fluorescent Lamp; 4.2 Franck-Hertz Experiment; 4.3 Bohr's Model of the Hydrogen Atom: Energy Quantization; 4.4 Practical Consequences of the Energy Quantization for Discharge Lamps; 4.5 The de Broglie Hypothesis; 4.6 The Davisson-Germer Experiment 4.7 Wave-Particle Dualism of the Electron4.8 Questions and Exercises; Chapter 5: The Particle Concept of Quantum Mechanics; 5.1 Particles and Waves in Classical Physics; 5.2 Double-Slit Experiment with a Single Electron; 5.3 The Born-Jordan Interpretation of the Electron Wave; 5.4 Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle; 5.5 Particle Concept of Quantum Mechanics; 5.6 The Scale Dependence of Physics; 5.7 Toward a New Physics; 5.8 The Significance of Electron Waves for Electrical Engineering; 5.9 Displaying Electron Waves; 5.10 Questions and Exercises; Reference Chapter 6: Measurement in Quantum Mechanics. Postulates 1-36.1 Physical Restrictions for the Wave Function of an Electron; 6.2 Mathematical Definitions and Laws Related to the Wave Function; 6.3 Mathematical Representation of the Measurement by Operators; 6.4 Mathematical Definitions and Laws Related to Operators; 6.5 Measurement in Quantum Mechanics; 6.6 Questions and Exercises; Chapter 7: Observables in Quantum Mechanics. Postulates 4 and 5. The Relation of Classical and Quantum Mechanics; 7.1 The Canonical Commutation Relations of Heisenberg; 7.2 The Choice of Operators by Schrödinger
Summary: Quantum mechanics (QM) is latently present in the life of electrical engineers already, since the hardware of todays information technology - from electrical data processing, through interconversion of electronic and optical information, to data storage and visualization - works on QM principles.
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Includes index

Table of contents Title Page; Copyright; Dedication; Table of Contents; Preface; Chapter 1: Introduction: Classical Physics and the Physics of Information Technology; 1.1 The Perception of Matter in Classical Physics: Particles and Waves; 1.2 Axioms of Classical Physics; 1.3 Status and Effect of Classical Physics by the End of the Nineteenth Century; 1.4 Physics Background of the High-Tech Era; 1.5 Developments in Physics Reflected by the Development of Lighting Technology; 1.6 The Demand for Physics in Electrical Engineering and Informatics: Today and Tomorrow; 1.7 Questions and Exercises Chapter 2: Blackbody Radiation: The Physics of the Light Bulb and of the Pyrometer2.1 Electromagnetic Radiation of Heated Bodies; 2.2 Electromagnetic Field in Equilibrium with the Walls of a Metal Box; 2.3 Determination of the Average Energy per Degree of Freedom. Planck's Law; 2.4 Practical Applications of Planck's Law for the Blackbody Radiation; 2.5 Significance of Planck's Law for the Physics; 2.6 Questions and Exercises; Chapter 3: Photons: The Physics of Lasers; 3.1 The Photoelectric Effect 3.2 Practical Applications of the Photoelectric Effect (Photocell, Solar Cell, Chemical Analysis)3.3 The Compton Effect; 3.4 The Photon Hypothesis of Einstein; 3.5 Planck's Law and the Photons. Stimulated Emission; 3.6 The Laser; 3.7 Questions and Exercises; Chapter 4: Electrons: The Physics of the Discharge Lamps; 4.1 Fluorescent Lamp; 4.2 Franck-Hertz Experiment; 4.3 Bohr's Model of the Hydrogen Atom: Energy Quantization; 4.4 Practical Consequences of the Energy Quantization for Discharge Lamps; 4.5 The de Broglie Hypothesis; 4.6 The Davisson-Germer Experiment 4.7 Wave-Particle Dualism of the Electron4.8 Questions and Exercises; Chapter 5: The Particle Concept of Quantum Mechanics; 5.1 Particles and Waves in Classical Physics; 5.2 Double-Slit Experiment with a Single Electron; 5.3 The Born-Jordan Interpretation of the Electron Wave; 5.4 Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle; 5.5 Particle Concept of Quantum Mechanics; 5.6 The Scale Dependence of Physics; 5.7 Toward a New Physics; 5.8 The Significance of Electron Waves for Electrical Engineering; 5.9 Displaying Electron Waves; 5.10 Questions and Exercises; Reference Chapter 6: Measurement in Quantum Mechanics. Postulates 1-36.1 Physical Restrictions for the Wave Function of an Electron; 6.2 Mathematical Definitions and Laws Related to the Wave Function; 6.3 Mathematical Representation of the Measurement by Operators; 6.4 Mathematical Definitions and Laws Related to Operators; 6.5 Measurement in Quantum Mechanics; 6.6 Questions and Exercises; Chapter 7: Observables in Quantum Mechanics. Postulates 4 and 5. The Relation of Classical and Quantum Mechanics; 7.1 The Canonical Commutation Relations of Heisenberg; 7.2 The Choice of Operators by Schrödinger

Quantum mechanics (QM) is latently present in the life of electrical engineers already, since the hardware of todays information technology - from electrical data processing, through interconversion of electronic and optical information, to data storage and visualization - works on QM principles.

Electronics & Communications Engineering

Sagar Shahanawaz

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