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Making Win32 applications mobile : porting to Windows CE / Nancy Nicolaisen.

By: Nicolaisen, Nancy.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Indianapolis, Ind. : John Wiley, c2002Description: xvii, 540 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0471216186 (alk. paper); 9780471428671.Subject(s): Application software portingDDC classification: 005.268 Online resources: Contributor biographical information | Publisher description | Table of contents | WorldCat details | Ebook Fulltext
Contents:
Table of contents Cover -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- The Windows CE Opportunity -- WhatÌs in This Book and How It Is Organized -- Tips for Setting Up the Development Environment -- Part One: Adapting Application Appearance to Windows CE -- Chapter 1: User Interface -- The Resource File Is a Road Map -- Porting Icons and Cursors -- Windows CE Menu Bars -- The MenuBar Example -- Porting Dialogs -- Using Windows CE Tabbed Dialogs -- Looking Ahead -- Chapter 2: A Better Approach to Forms -- Command Bands: The Win CE Forms -- Steps to a Form Using CommandBands -- Really, Really, Really Long Forms -- I Want It All Now -- Looking Ahead -- Chapter 3: Handling Graphical Input and Output -- The Linker, Your New Best Friend -- Drawing Lines -- Dissecting the EtchASketch Example -- Using Bitmaps -- Device-Independent vs. Device-Dependent Bitmaps -- Making Bitmap Backgrounds Transparent -- When to Use Device-Independent Bitmaps -- Color -- Pens, Brushes, and Fonts -- Looking Ahead -- Chapter 4: Handling Stylus Input -- The Stylus Behaves as a One-Button Mouse -- Using the CE Ink Control -- First Steps with the RichInk Control -- Take-Home Lessons -- Looking Ahead -- Chapter 5: The Windows CE Shell -- The Job of the CE Shell -- Where the Files Are -- Examining the FindDirs Example -- Finding Special Folder Paths on the HPC and HPC Pro -- The Shell's User Interface Elements -- Adding Shortcuts to the Start Menu -- Adding and Deleting Shortcuts Without Using the Start Menu -- Adding Application Icons to the Taskbar -- Adding Documents to the Most Recently Used List -- Shell Behavior for the Palmtop CE Platforms -- Looking at the FullScreenDlg Example -- Taking Over the Entire Screen -- Looking Ahead -- Part Two: Translating Win32 Application Behaviors to Windows CE -- Chapter 6: Writing Memory-Efficient CE Applications -- Something New Under the Sun -- Anatomy 101 -- How CE Applications Allocate Memory -- Making Large Allocations for Fairly Limited Durations -- Using Private Heaps for Frequent Small Allocations -- Using the Local Heap -- Reengineering Temp Files -- Stack-Based Data -- Optimizing Your Application's Use of Data Segments -- Read/ Write Data Sections -- Low-Memory Conditions -- Allocation Request Filtering -- Warning Applications about Low Memory with the WM_ HIBERNATE Message -- Memory Reconnaissance Tools -- Estimating Available Memory -- Looking Ahead -- Chapter 7: Using the Windows CE Registry -- Windows CE Registry Access Functions -- Accessing the Registry on a CE Device -- Adding Registry Keys -- Accessing and Enumerating Existing Keys -- Adding Values to Keys -- Enumerating Registry Values -- Reading a Single Named Value -- Deleting Values -- Deleting Keys -- Registry Porting Checklist -- Looking Ahead -- Chapter 8: File Handling, File Access, and Data Portability -- Where the Files Are -- Reading and Writing Files -- Using Memory-Mapped Files -- Numeric Data Portability -- A Few More Thoughts on File Handling and Data Portability -- Looking Ah.
Summary: Summary: A guide for Windows developers seeking to transfer their skills to mobile platforms. Windows CE is a subset of Windows, optimized for handheld devices. In an increasingly mobile world, millions of developers with Windows programming experience need to quickly transfer their skills to creating compact, asynchronous CE applications.
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Table of contents Cover --
Contents --
Acknowledgments --
Introduction --
The Windows CE Opportunity --
WhatÌs in This Book and How It Is Organized --
Tips for Setting Up the Development Environment --
Part One: Adapting Application Appearance to Windows CE --
Chapter 1: User Interface --
The Resource File Is a Road Map --
Porting Icons and Cursors --
Windows CE Menu Bars --
The MenuBar Example --
Porting Dialogs --
Using Windows CE Tabbed Dialogs --
Looking Ahead --
Chapter 2: A Better Approach to Forms --
Command Bands: The Win CE Forms --
Steps to a Form Using CommandBands --
Really, Really, Really Long Forms --
I Want It All Now --
Looking Ahead --
Chapter 3: Handling Graphical Input and Output --
The Linker, Your New Best Friend --
Drawing Lines --
Dissecting the EtchASketch Example --
Using Bitmaps --
Device-Independent vs. Device-Dependent Bitmaps --
Making Bitmap Backgrounds Transparent --
When to Use Device-Independent Bitmaps --
Color --
Pens, Brushes, and Fonts --
Looking Ahead --
Chapter 4: Handling Stylus Input --
The Stylus Behaves as a One-Button Mouse --
Using the CE Ink Control --
First Steps with the RichInk Control --
Take-Home Lessons --
Looking Ahead --
Chapter 5: The Windows CE Shell --
The Job of the CE Shell --
Where the Files Are --
Examining the FindDirs Example --
Finding Special Folder Paths on the HPC and HPC Pro --
The Shell's User Interface Elements --
Adding Shortcuts to the Start Menu --
Adding and Deleting Shortcuts Without Using the Start Menu --
Adding Application Icons to the Taskbar --
Adding Documents to the Most Recently Used List --
Shell Behavior for the Palmtop CE Platforms --
Looking at the FullScreenDlg Example --
Taking Over the Entire Screen --
Looking Ahead --
Part Two: Translating Win32 Application Behaviors to Windows CE --
Chapter 6: Writing Memory-Efficient CE Applications --
Something New Under the Sun --
Anatomy 101 --
How CE Applications Allocate Memory --
Making Large Allocations for Fairly Limited Durations --
Using Private Heaps for Frequent Small Allocations --
Using the Local Heap --
Reengineering Temp Files --
Stack-Based Data --
Optimizing Your Application's Use of Data Segments --
Read/ Write Data Sections --
Low-Memory Conditions --
Allocation Request Filtering --
Warning Applications about Low Memory with the WM_ HIBERNATE Message --
Memory Reconnaissance Tools --
Estimating Available Memory --
Looking Ahead --
Chapter 7: Using the Windows CE Registry --
Windows CE Registry Access Functions --
Accessing the Registry on a CE Device --
Adding Registry Keys --
Accessing and Enumerating Existing Keys --
Adding Values to Keys --
Enumerating Registry Values --
Reading a Single Named Value --
Deleting Values --
Deleting Keys --
Registry Porting Checklist --
Looking Ahead --
Chapter 8: File Handling, File Access, and Data Portability --
Where the Files Are --
Reading and Writing Files --
Using Memory-Mapped Files --
Numeric Data Portability --
A Few More Thoughts on File Handling and Data Portability --
Looking Ah.

Summary:
A guide for Windows developers seeking to transfer their skills to mobile platforms. Windows CE is a subset of Windows, optimized for handheld devices. In an increasingly mobile world, millions of developers with Windows programming experience need to quickly transfer their skills to creating compact, asynchronous CE applications.

Computer Science & Engineering

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