The future of economic growth : as new becomes old / Robert Boyer.

By: Boyer, Robert, 1943-
Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Original language: French Series: Saint-Gobain Centre for Economic Studies series: Publisher: Cheltenham : Edward Elgar, 2004Description: xvii, 174 p. ; 25 cmISBN: 184376606XUniform titles: Croissance début de siècle. Subject(s): Economic development | Information technology | Economic forecasting | Economic history -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 338.9 Online resources: WorldCat details | E-book Fulltext
Contents:
Table of contents A shared vision 1 -- Beyond the myths 2 -- A kaleidoscopic approach 3 -- 1 A social construct and an analytical challenge 5 -- The American economy in the 1990s was no longer the same as that in the 1960s 5 -- Combining micro- and macroeconomics, history and geography 8 -- The difficulty of analysing structural changes in real time 9 -- 2 Microeconomic instability and an uncertain organizational model 14 -- Digitalized information and redundant networks 14 -- The three figures of the 'new economy' 17 -- The search for an organizational model for the 'new economy' 19 -- 3 A growth regime driven by information and communications technology? 26 -- The new and the old economies: a conjunction of two virtuous circles? 26 -- The Solow paradox has not been entirely resolved yet 28 -- Faster potential growth: problems with forecasting 33 -- The 'new economy' has had different effects on different sectors 36 -- 4 Genealogy of the 'new economy': the institutional change at the heart of the US trajectory 44 -- 1973-2000: the long search for successors to the Fordist growth regime 44 -- An early deregulation of the product market 51 -- Increasingly competitive labour markets 53 -- ICT as a way of overcoming management problems in large companies 55 -- The peace dividend 57 -- A new architecture for economic policy 58 -- Multiform financial innovations 60 -- Internationalization underpinned internal US dynamics 62 -- Should other countries adopt the institutional architecture of the USA? 63 -- 5 The geography of the 'new economy': the diversity of institutional architectures 65 -- ICT at the heart of the technological change process 65 -- Pre-conditions for virtuous growth: two configurations 68 -- Was the US configuration exemplary or just singular? 70 -- Three institutional configurations 71 -- Is it necessary to produce ICT in order to know how to use them? 73 -- 6 2000-2002: reassessing the potential of ICT-driven growth 77 -- The Internet bubble: from boom to burst 77 -- Traders and economists forget the lessons of history at their own peril 86 -- Consecutive technological paradigms do not resemble one another 90 -- 7 The long-term historical outlook after the Internet bubble 101 -- Overestimating ICT's role 101 -- The end of three major myths 105 -- Inequalities within and between countries: down with technological determinism 107 -- An uncertain mode of regulation 109 -- The opposition between the old and the new economy is obsolete 115 -- 8 The emergence of an anthropogenetic model 120 -- ICT as the vector of real-time management? 120 -- Moving towards a network economy? 124 -- The transition towards a knowledge economy? 128 -- In the long run: an anthropogenetic model 136 -- The future lasts for a long time 145 -- Behind the success of the 'new economy': a crisis already in the making 145 -- Multiform institutional changes rather than technological determinism 147 -- The geography of the 'new economy' actually includes the Nordic countries 147 -- ICT is already a mature industry 148 -- The power of Wall Street instead of Silicon Valley 149 -- Altered competition but no return to mythical competitive markets 150 -- Between speculation and utopia: the anthropogenetic model 151.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
E-Book E-Book EWU Library
E-book
Non-fiction 338.9 BOF 2004 (Browse shelf) Not for loan
Text Text EWU Library
Reserve Section
Non-fiction 338.9 BOF (Browse shelf) C-1 Not For Loan 16805
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Online version:
Boyer, Robert, 1943-
Future of economic growth.
Cheltenham, UK ; Northhampton, MA, USA : E. Elgar, c2004
(OCoLC)651774387

Table of contents A shared vision 1 --
Beyond the myths 2 --
A kaleidoscopic approach 3 --
1 A social construct and an analytical challenge 5 --
The American economy in the 1990s was no longer the same as that in the 1960s 5 --
Combining micro- and macroeconomics, history and geography 8 --
The difficulty of analysing structural changes in real time 9 --
2 Microeconomic instability and an uncertain organizational model 14 --
Digitalized information and redundant networks 14 --
The three figures of the 'new economy' 17 --
The search for an organizational model for the 'new economy' 19 --
3 A growth regime driven by information and communications technology? 26 --
The new and the old economies: a conjunction of two virtuous circles? 26 --
The Solow paradox has not been entirely resolved yet 28 --
Faster potential growth: problems with forecasting 33 --
The 'new economy' has had different effects on different sectors 36 --
4 Genealogy of the 'new economy': the institutional change at the heart of the US trajectory 44 --
1973-2000: the long search for successors to the Fordist growth regime 44 --
An early deregulation of the product market 51 --
Increasingly competitive labour markets 53 --
ICT as a way of overcoming management problems in large companies 55 --
The peace dividend 57 --
A new architecture for economic policy 58 --
Multiform financial innovations 60 --
Internationalization underpinned internal US dynamics 62 --
Should other countries adopt the institutional architecture of the USA? 63 --
5 The geography of the 'new economy': the diversity of institutional architectures 65 --
ICT at the heart of the technological change process 65 --
Pre-conditions for virtuous growth: two configurations 68 --
Was the US configuration exemplary or just singular? 70 --
Three institutional configurations 71 --
Is it necessary to produce ICT in order to know how to use them? 73 --
6 2000-2002: reassessing the potential of ICT-driven growth 77 --
The Internet bubble: from boom to burst 77 --
Traders and economists forget the lessons of history at their own peril 86 --
Consecutive technological paradigms do not resemble one another 90 --
7 The long-term historical outlook after the Internet bubble 101 --
Overestimating ICT's role 101 --
The end of three major myths 105 --
Inequalities within and between countries: down with technological determinism 107 --
An uncertain mode of regulation 109 --
The opposition between the old and the new economy is obsolete 115 --
8 The emergence of an anthropogenetic model 120 --
ICT as the vector of real-time management? 120 --
Moving towards a network economy? 124 --
The transition towards a knowledge economy? 128 --
In the long run: an anthropogenetic model 136 --
The future lasts for a long time 145 --
Behind the success of the 'new economy': a crisis already in the making 145 --
Multiform institutional changes rather than technological determinism 147 --
The geography of the 'new economy' actually includes the Nordic countries 147 --
ICT is already a mature industry 148 --
The power of Wall Street instead of Silicon Valley 149 --
Altered competition but no return to mythical competitive markets 150 --
Between speculation and utopia: the anthropogenetic model 151.

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