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Charles Dickens / Donald Hawkes.

By: Hawes, Donald.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Writers' lives (Continuum (Firm)): Publisher: London ; New York : Continuum, c2007Description: vi, 167 p. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9780826489647 (pbk.); 0826489648 (pbk.); 9780826489630; 082648963X.Subject(s): Novelists, English -- 19th century -- BiographyDDC classification: 823.8 Online resources: Contributor biographical information | Table of contents only | Publisher description | WorldCat details | E-book Fulltext
Contents:
Table of contents 1. Introduction: Why read Dickens?; 2. Dickens's life - a brief biography; A Guide to the Texts: Sketches by Boz, Pickwick Papers, Oliver Twist; 3. Society in fact and fiction; Nicholas Nickleby, Old Curiosity Shop, Barnaby Rudge; 4. Institutions in fact and fiction; Martin Chuzzlewit, A Christmas Carol, Dombey and Son; 5. Dickens's Illustrators; David Copperfield, Bleak House; 6. Families and relationships in fact and fiction; Hard Times, Little Dorrit; 7. Jokers and Knaves: Dickens's comic characters and villains Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations; 8. Art and entertainment; Our Mutual Friend, The Mystery of Edwin Drood; 9. Adaptations; Index.
Summary: Summary: Charles Dickens is without doubt a literary giant. The most widely read author of his own generation, his works remain incredibly popular today. Often seen as the quintessential Victorian novelist, his texts convey perhaps better than any others the drive for wealth and progress and the social contrasts that characterized the Victorian era. His works are widely studied throughout the world both as literary masterpieces and as classic examples of the nineteenth century novel. Combining a biographical approach with close reading of the novels, Donald Hawes offers an illuminating portrait of Dickens as a writer and insight into his life and times. This book gives readers and students a short, lively but sophisticated introduction to Dickens's work and the personal and social context in which it was written.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
E-Book E-Book EWU Library
E-book
Fiction 823.8 HAC 2007 (Browse shelf) Not for loan
Text Text EWU Library
Reserve Section
Fiction 823.8 HAC 2007 (Browse shelf) C-1 Not For Loan 24182
Text Text EWU Library
Circulation Section
Fiction 823.8 HAC 2007 (Browse shelf) C-2 Available 24183
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Online version:
Hawes, Donald.
Charles Dickens.
London ; New York : Continuum, c2007
(OCoLC)608448937

Includes bibliographical references (p. 159-164) and index.

Table of contents 1. Introduction: Why read Dickens?; 2. Dickens's life - a brief biography; A Guide to the Texts: Sketches by Boz, Pickwick Papers, Oliver Twist; 3. Society in fact and fiction; Nicholas Nickleby, Old Curiosity Shop, Barnaby Rudge; 4. Institutions in fact and fiction; Martin Chuzzlewit, A Christmas Carol, Dombey and Son; 5. Dickens's Illustrators; David Copperfield, Bleak House; 6. Families and relationships in fact and fiction; Hard Times, Little Dorrit; 7. Jokers and Knaves: Dickens's comic characters and villains Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations; 8. Art and entertainment; Our Mutual Friend, The Mystery of Edwin Drood; 9. Adaptations; Index.

Summary:
Charles Dickens is without doubt a literary giant. The most widely read author of his own generation, his works remain incredibly popular today. Often seen as the quintessential Victorian novelist, his texts convey perhaps better than any others the drive for wealth and progress and the social contrasts that characterized the Victorian era. His works are widely studied throughout the world both as literary masterpieces and as classic examples of the nineteenth century novel. Combining a biographical approach with close reading of the novels, Donald Hawes offers an illuminating portrait of Dickens as a writer and insight into his life and times. This book gives readers and students a short, lively but sophisticated introduction to Dickens's work and the personal and social context in which it was written.

English

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