Amazon cover image
Image from Amazon.com

Teaching effective source use : classroom approaches that work / Jennifer A. Mott-Smith, Zuzana Tomaš and Ilka Kostka.

By: Mott-Smith, Jennifer AContributor(s): Tomaš, Zuzana [author.] | Kostka, Ilka [author.]Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Publication details: Ann Arbor, MI : University of Michigan Press, 2017. Description: xv, 208 pages ; 26 cmISBN: 0472036890; 9780472036899 (paperback : acidfree paper)Subject(s): Plagiarism -- Prevention | Research -- Methodology | English language -- Study and teaching -- Foreign speakers | Multicultural education | English language -- Study and teaching -- Foreign speakers | Multicultural education | Research -- MethodologyDDC classification: 808 LOC classification: PN167 | .M68 2017Online resources: WorldCat Details
Contents:
TOC "Plagiarism" Hysteria: Taking a Stance against the Cat-and-Mouse Game -- The Cat-and-Mouse Game -- Removing the Ethical Frame from Discussions of Source Use -- L2 Student Writers in an Age of "Plagiarism" Hysteria -- Issues in L2 Writers' Source Use -- Revisiting the Wrongness of "Plagiarism" -- Take-Away Points -- The Concept Dimension: Exploring the Cultural Constructs Surrounding the Terms Originality and Plagiarism -- What We Know from Research and Theory -- Authority: Voice, Originality, and Transformed Knowledge -- Ownership, Community Membership, and Common Knowledge -- "Plagiarism" and Copyright -- Connecting to the Classroom -- Lessons 1-6 -- Take-Away Points -- The Discourse Dimension: Teaching How Writers Use References to Situate Themselves in a Discourse Community -- What We Know from Research and Theory -- Using References to Establish a Framework of Ideas and Authority -- Connecting References to One's Own Beliefs and the Engagement of Readers -- Differences in Source Use across Disciplinary Discourse Communities -- Connecting to the Classroom -- Lessons 1-7 -- Take-Away Points -- The Sentence Dimension: Addressing Patchwriting, Paraphrasing, Summarizing, and Quoting -- What We Know from Research and Theory -- Patchwriting and Copying: Learning English by Reusing Text -- Paraphrasing and Formulaic Language -- Incorporation of Paraphrases, Summaries, and Quotes -- Connecting to the Classroom -- Lessons 1-6 -- Take-Away Points -- The Process Dimension: Helping Writers Develop Effective Strategies for Reading, Thinking, and Writing -- What We Know from Research and Theory -- The Role of Thinking in the Reading-Writing Process -- Effective Reading-Thinking-Writing Processes -- Connecting to the Classroom -- Lessons 1-6 -- Take-Away Points -- The Response Dimension: Developing Discussions around Source Use Decisions -- What We Know from Research and Theory -- Formative Response: A Pedagogical Approach -- Understanding Source Use Decisions: Feedback as Dialogue -- Centering the Student: Peer Review and Self-Assessment -- Connecting to the Classroom -- Lessons 1-6 -- Take-Away Points -- Bringing It All Together: Teaching the Dimensions of Source Use -- Teaching the Basics: Jennifer's Approach -- Context -- Course Goals -- Teaching the Dimensions -- Connecting Experience with Theme-Based Source Content: Zuzana's Approach -- Context -- Course Goals -- Teaching the Dimensions -- Developing Independent Learners: Ilka's Approach -- Context -- Course Goals -- Teaching the Dimensions -- Teaching Values -- Final Thoughts.
Summary: This is a comprehensive and practical resource for teachers who assign source-based writing assignments to second language students in a variety of settings. It may also be of use to those who teach in graduate L2 teacher training programs or Writing across the Curriculum courses, are consultants and tutors in writing centers, or are library faculty working with student researchers. The book's first chapter discusses the ways that plagiarism has traditionally been cast in ethical terms and argues that this frame is not helpful to L2 writers; it stresses that a variety of diverse behaviors have been included under the umbrella of plagiarism (fairly and unfairly) and challenges the stereotyping of L2 writers as plagiarizers through a discussion of culture, language, and identity. Subsequent chapters introduce the five approaches for teaching textual reuse-concept, discourse, sentence, process, response-and feature multiple ready-made lessons for each. The book's final chapter shows how the three authors incorporate the five approaches in the courses they teach: a first-year composition course for L2 writers, a research paper writing course for third- and fourth-year undergraduate L2 writers, and an L2 graduate writing course. This resource features a handy overview chart of the lessons to help teachers find the type of lesson they need at any time; it also includes student writing samples that may be used to help illustrate some of the lessons, as well as graphic organizers and videos. Book jacket.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Star ratings
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Text Text EWU Library
Reserve Section
Non-fiction 808 MOT 2017 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Not For Loan 30039
Total holds: 0

"Michigan teacher resource"--Cover

Includes bibliographical references (pages 196-208).

TOC "Plagiarism" Hysteria: Taking a Stance against the Cat-and-Mouse Game --
The Cat-and-Mouse Game --
Removing the Ethical Frame from Discussions of Source Use --
L2 Student Writers in an Age of "Plagiarism" Hysteria --
Issues in L2 Writers' Source Use --
Revisiting the Wrongness of "Plagiarism" --
Take-Away Points --
The Concept Dimension: Exploring the Cultural Constructs Surrounding the Terms Originality and Plagiarism --
What We Know from Research and Theory --
Authority: Voice, Originality, and Transformed Knowledge --
Ownership, Community Membership, and Common Knowledge --
"Plagiarism" and Copyright --
Connecting to the Classroom --
Lessons 1-6 --
Take-Away Points --
The Discourse Dimension: Teaching How Writers Use References to Situate Themselves in a Discourse Community --
What We Know from Research and Theory --
Using References to Establish a Framework of Ideas and Authority --
Connecting References to One's Own Beliefs and the Engagement of Readers --
Differences in Source Use across Disciplinary Discourse Communities --
Connecting to the Classroom --
Lessons 1-7 --
Take-Away Points --
The Sentence Dimension: Addressing Patchwriting, Paraphrasing, Summarizing, and Quoting --
What We Know from Research and Theory --
Patchwriting and Copying: Learning English by Reusing Text --
Paraphrasing and Formulaic Language --
Incorporation of Paraphrases, Summaries, and Quotes --
Connecting to the Classroom --
Lessons 1-6 --
Take-Away Points --
The Process Dimension: Helping Writers Develop Effective Strategies for Reading, Thinking, and Writing --
What We Know from Research and Theory --
The Role of Thinking in the Reading-Writing Process --
Effective Reading-Thinking-Writing Processes --
Connecting to the Classroom --
Lessons 1-6 --
Take-Away Points --
The Response Dimension: Developing Discussions around Source Use Decisions --
What We Know from Research and Theory --
Formative Response: A Pedagogical Approach --
Understanding Source Use Decisions: Feedback as Dialogue --
Centering the Student: Peer Review and Self-Assessment --
Connecting to the Classroom --
Lessons 1-6 --
Take-Away Points --
Bringing It All Together: Teaching the Dimensions of Source Use --
Teaching the Basics: Jennifer's Approach --
Context --
Course Goals --
Teaching the Dimensions --
Connecting Experience with Theme-Based Source Content: Zuzana's Approach --
Context --
Course Goals --
Teaching the Dimensions --
Developing Independent Learners: Ilka's Approach --
Context --
Course Goals --
Teaching the Dimensions --
Teaching Values --
Final Thoughts.


This is a comprehensive and practical resource for teachers who assign source-based writing assignments to second language students in a variety of settings. It may also be of use to those who teach in graduate L2 teacher training programs or Writing across the Curriculum courses, are consultants and tutors in writing centers, or are library faculty working with student researchers. The book's first chapter discusses the ways that plagiarism has traditionally been cast in ethical terms and argues that this frame is not helpful to L2 writers; it stresses that a variety of diverse behaviors have been included under the umbrella of plagiarism (fairly and unfairly) and challenges the stereotyping of L2 writers as plagiarizers through a discussion of culture, language, and identity. Subsequent chapters introduce the five approaches for teaching textual reuse-concept, discourse, sentence, process, response-and feature multiple ready-made lessons for each. The book's final chapter shows how the three authors incorporate the five approaches in the courses they teach: a first-year composition course for L2 writers, a research paper writing course for third- and fourth-year undergraduate L2 writers, and an L2 graduate writing course. This resource features a handy overview chart of the lessons to help teachers find the type of lesson they need at any time; it also includes student writing samples that may be used to help illustrate some of the lessons, as well as graphic organizers and videos. Book jacket.

English English

Sagar Shahanawaz

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.

Library Home | Contacts | E-Resources
Copyright @ 2011-2022 EWU Library
East West University